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 P R O D U C T I O N S   >   T H E   D R E S S E R

The Dresser

The Dresser
by Ronald Harwood

where and when | cast | team

 A B O U T


The theatre isn't what it was, but then it never was what it was.

This comedy depicts the frantic backstage life behind repertory theatre during the Second World War. Norman is the dresser to Sir, reminding him of his lines, organising him behind the scenes with quiet devotion. A cast of extraordinary, strongly painted characters mingle with smart, funny dialogue in this thoroughly English comedy for anyone who ever loved the theatre.

book tickets

 W H E R E   &   W H E N   &   H O W   M U C H

at the Welsh Church Hall

6 adults
3 concessions

advance booking only
Online booking subject to a transaction fee

Thu 28 September 2006, 8pm
Fri 29 September 2006, 8pm
Sat 30 September 2006, 3pm
Sat 30 September 2006, 8pm

C A S T

Norman

Tim Saward

Her Ladyship

Khadija Cheetham-Slade

Irene

Jana Theron

Madge

Nicola Holland

Sir

Gary Adams

Geoffrey Thornton

Vaughan Prosser

Mr Oxenby

Colin Heinink

Gloucester

Andrew Booth

Kent

Matthew House

Albany / Knight

Paul Robinson

Gentleman / Knight

Basil Clarke

 P R O D U C T I O N   T E A M

Director

Chris Pethers

Producer

Jan Prendergast

Stage Manager

Jenny Moorby

Front of House Manager

Jackie Withnall

Costume

Victoria Bettelheim

Lighting Design

Simon Lyall

Lighting Crew

Ella Averill, Simon Lyall, Sarah McLeod

Sound / Props Assistance

Peter Raggett

Props Assistance

Stephen Cahill-Hayes

Publicity

Jenny Moorby, Jackie Withnall

Poster/Flier Design

Tim Saward

Programme Layout

Phil Braithwaite

Photography

Robert Bettelheim

Front of House Team

Alister Agnew, Natasha Agnew, Stephen Balchin, Ita Hill, Jim Killeen, Thos Ribbits, Jane Ridout, Monica Saunders, Anthony Townsend, Sacha Walker

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Images by and © Dave Gatward

 P O S T E R

Poster. Click for larger version
design: Tim Saward | download flier (.doc)

 R A D I O  

Download the mp3 recording of Khadija being interviewed on Whipps Cross Hospital Radio on the 22nd September for the then forthcoming production of The Dresser.

Whipps Cross interview (12Mb)

 

 R E V I E W

Karen Hart: Ronald Harwood's bittersweet play dealing with the relationship between a well-respected actor and his effeminate dresser was excellent.

The two main characters, 'Sir' and his dresser, 'Norman', were immaculately played. Gary Adam's portrayal of Sir's complex, multi-faceted character was faultless, displaying anger, hopelessness, a maudlin sentimentality for a theatrical life lost to the war and ultimately a belief that the show must go on - at any cost.

Tim Saward as Norman as the put-upon friend and confidant, delivered his lines with a wonderful blend of sarcastic enlightenment. On several occasions he had the audience laughing out loud with his bitchy put-downs and his timing and delivery were faultless.

The supporting roles were both polished and well cast, with Khadija Cheetham-Slade, as Sir's long suffering partner, playing her part beautifully.

Nicola Holland and Jana Theron in the roles of Madge and Irene were convincing and Vaughan Prosser and Colin Heinink as members of the company; Geoffrey Thornton and Mr Oxenby were a delight, creating memorable and humorous characters. The scenery and props helped to instil a feeling for the year 1942, in which the play is set and the split stage, depicting both Sir's dressing room and the stage wings, was a nice touch that worked very well here. In fact the whole play was a delight, showing once again this group's dedication and professionalism to the theatre.

I noticed I was not alone in having to wipe a tear from my eye as the curtain came down, in what was ultimately a very moving production.

Guardian - October 26th 2006

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